Women Conductors programme – Finding your voice

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Karin Hendrickson reflects on the way the RPS Women Conductors programme is providing women a unique way to develop and share their voice.

There are some avenues of life that cause us to become soldiers for the generations that follow us. I think of the women who first marched and demonstrated so valiantly in order to gain the right to vote – I believe that they understood it wasn’t just so that their voice could be heard during their lifetime, but so that every following woman in their own lifetime could be heard, as well.

In my work as a conductor, I have a unique way of sharing my voice. In the performance, I’m the single person on stage NOT making any sound – yet through physical gesture my voice is perhaps symbolically the loudest, and the most uniquely displayed.

It’s this unique way of ‘having a voice’ that has caused the RPS Women Conductors programme to take notice of a certain disparity among the younger ranks of women. We live in a society that is incredibly vocal – your voice can be online, it can be heard, it can be read, yes – it can even be ‘seen’, and yes, it can insidiously still be silenced. And for younger women, living in a tumultuous time of peer-to-peer judgement, ever changing socio-economic systems, and growing up during a time where a phone or computer with predictive text can type your sentences for you – how do you learn to express your own creativity, your own voice, confidently, with all of these elements in play?

The workshops we run are therefore not just about conducting. We begin our workshop from the standpoint of what it is to ‘be a conductor’, but the total workshop experience is really about helping these women explore and develop their own ‘voice’ of confidence – to develop an awareness not just of what they are ‘saying’ with their vocal chords, but also how they are ‘saying’ it with their bodies, their posture, their gestures, and their face and eyes.

The workshops include many elements of physical posture and movement. We explore confidence, and how that translates to expressing who you are as an individual and a creative human being. By the end, we also will have explored physical conducting and musicianship. But the final goal is not to end up with a room of confident female conductors – the end goal is to end up with a room full of women more confident and prepared to be their unique selves.

The RPS Women Conductors programme curates a range of conducting experiences, from introducing novice female musicians to conducting, to helping full-time, professional female musicians who want to transition into conducting as a profession gain valuable experience. But our work in schools takes on another element, that of helping to develop confidence in women. We may end up with some great conductors along the way, but we’re first interested in making sure women everywhere have the confidence to be themselves, with their own voice.

This year we’re sponsoring the RPS Women Conductors programme in order to enable more women across the UK to have access to these training and development opportunities.

Written by Karin Hendrickson (Artistic Associate for the RPS Women Conductors programme) as part of RPS’s artistic partnership with ABRSM

Find out more about RPS Women Conductors

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