Kristīne Balanas – The Challenges of Playing Concerti without a Conductor

Kristīne Balanas, recipient of the RPS Julius Isserlis Scholarship in 2015, shares her experiences of performing violin concerti without a conductor.

In 2015, I had my first experience of a “conductorless” performance, playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto with the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris. Not having anyone to rely on to direct, I was worried we might do the musical equivalent of running around like a headless chicken! But of course an orchestra has many fine heads, and once on stage there was not much to worry about. It was in many ways a relief – indeed a liberation – to discover what we were capable of on our own. Continue reading “Kristīne Balanas – The Challenges of Playing Concerti without a Conductor”

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Women Conductors programme – Finding your voice

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Karin Hendrickson reflects on the way the RPS Women Conductors programme is providing women a unique way to develop and share their voice.

There are some avenues of life that cause us to become soldiers for the generations that follow us. I think of the women who first marched and demonstrated so valiantly in order to gain the right to vote – I believe that they understood it wasn’t just so that their voice could be heard during their lifetime, but so that every following woman in their own lifetime could be heard, as well.

In my work as a conductor, I have a unique way of sharing my voice. In the performance, I’m the single person on stage NOT making any sound – yet through physical gesture my voice is perhaps symbolically the loudest, and the most uniquely displayed.

It’s this unique way of ‘having a voice’ that has caused the RPS Women Conductors programme to take notice of a certain disparity among the younger ranks of women. We live in a society that is incredibly vocal – your voice can be online, it can be heard, it can be read, yes – it can even be ‘seen’, and yes, it can insidiously still be silenced. And for younger women, living in a tumultuous time of peer-to-peer judgement, ever changing socio-economic systems, and growing up during a time where a phone or computer with predictive text can type your sentences for you – how do you learn to express your own creativity, your own voice, confidently, with all of these elements in play?

The workshops we run for younger women are therefore not just about conducting. We begin our workshop from the standpoint of what it is to ‘be a conductor’, but the total workshop experience is really about helping these young women explore and develop their own ‘voice’ of confidence – to develop an awareness not just of what they are ‘saying’ with their vocal chords, but also how they are ‘saying’ it with their bodies, their posture, their gestures, and their face and eyes.

The workshops include many elements of physical posture and movement. We explore confidence, and how that translates to expressing who you are as an individual and a creative human being. By the end, we also will have explored physical conducting and musicianship. But the final goal is not to end up with a room of confident young female conductors – the end goal is to end up with a room full of young women more confident and prepared to be their unique selves.

The RPS Women Conductors programme curates a range of conducting experiences, from introducing novice female musicians to conducting, to helping full-time, professional female musicians who want to transition into conducting as a profession gain valuable experience. But our work in schools takes on another element, that of helping to develop confidence in young women. We may end up with some great conductors along the way, but we’re first interested in making sure young women everywhere have the confidence to be themselves, with their own voice.

This year we’re sponsoring the RPS Women Conductors programme in order to enable more women across the UK to have access to these training and development opportunities.

Written by Karin Hendrickson (Artistic Associate for the RPS Women Conductors programme) as part of RPS’s artistic partnership with ABRSM

Find out more about RPS Women Conductors

Live Music is…

RPS Executive Director, Rosie Johnson ponders what makes live music, and the RPS Music Awards, so special.

…contemplative, challenging, restorative, shared.

I nearly missed out on classical music. From a very early age my parents regularly took me to services at Canterbury Cathedral where my elder brothers were choristers. I was intoxicated by the music that I heard them sing, hugely impressed by the ritual and, let’s be honest, the idea of boarding school.

I just assumed that I would follow in their footsteps. When it was explained that I didn’t fit the brief, I came to a simple and, from my perspective, rather devastating conclusion: classical music was for boys.

It is easy to feel excluded from classical music….

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….sometimes it’s the language used to describe it, or musical one-upmanship, where those without an encyclopaedic knowledge of repertoire or performance history are deemed unable to fully appreciate what they hear. And sometimes, there are more fundamental barriers: economic, social, cultural, disability… or (and it seems surprising to be writing this in the 21st century) being born a girl. And yet, music is the most embracing of art forms, and live music, by offering bespoke, yet collegiate experiences to both audiences and performers, is the most inclusive of the lot.

The winners of this year’s Royal Philharmonic Society Music Awards will be announced on Tuesday 9 May. This awards ceremony is the only time each year that we celebrate the transformative, joyous experience of live music in the UK, in all its variety; those wondrous fleeting moments that are gone in a minute, but linger in the mind forever. And it’s this transient quality, a uniqueness that comes from unrepeatable listening, that sets live performance apart from recorded music. Recordings can capture that moment in time, but by allowing us to repeat it, over and over, a little of the magic of ‘liveness’ is lost….”

Read the full blog on BBC Music Magazine

More about the RPS Music Awards

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